Stonehenge

Introduction:

Over the centuries, the origin and purpose of Stonehenge has attracted a mix of science and speculation.  Nobody is able to say how Stonehenge ought to look, because there has never been a definitive version.  Stonehenge has been constantly evolving.  It began as a circular earthwork 4000 years ago with bluestones brought from Wales.

We should not therefore assume that Stonehenge is as constant as it is ancient.  It has often been changed - the stones have collapsed, been realigned, restored and repeatedly vandalized.  Conservation continues to be an issue.  Today they may only be viewed from behind a perimeter fence.

Bastable, J, Candlin, A., editors, (2005), 'Wandering stones: Stonehenge has been altered many times - even in our own age', in The truth about history: how new evidence is transforming the story of the past, Readers Digest, London, pp.66-69.

Use the following resources to find out: This was an amazing achievement by people who had limited technology, but what is it?  A calendar?  A religious site?  Something built by aliens?

Library resources:

On our shelves:

eReserve:

  • Scarre, Chris, editor, (1999), 'Stonehenge', The Seventy wonders of the ancient world: the great monuments and how they were built, Thames & Hudson, London, pp.92-96.

Reference resources:

General encyclopedia on our shelves:

Subject encyclopedia on our shelves:

  • Exploring Ancient civilizations.  Volume 10 - Stonehenge. pp. 724-725

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Britannica Online School Edition PreK-12

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